Posts tagged ‘art’

Immersive 3D Paintings on Layers of Transparent Film: An Interview with Artist David Spriggs

I would love to see these!

14.  Spriggs 2010 VISION_detail

To walk beside a painting by Canadian artist David Spriggs is an experience not to be missed. His works tread neatly along an unusually blurred frontier between sculpture and painting, greeting viewers with an all encompassing vision that powerfully touches on the ethereal. How does he realize such arresting pieces? By meticulously painting on hundreds of sheets of thin, transparent film. Continue reading…

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The Art of Ofey: Richard Feynman’s Little-Known Sketches & Drawings

“I wanted to convey an emotion I have about the beauty of the world…this feeling about the glories of the universe.”

Just like Sylvia Plath and Queen Victoria, Nobel-winning physicist Richard Feynman —champion of scientific culturegraphic novel herocrusader for integrityholder of the key to scienceadviser of future generations,bongo player — was a surprisingly gifted semi-secret artist. He started drawing at the age of 44 in 1962, shortly after developing the visual language for his famous Feynman diagrams, after a series of amicable arguments about art vs. science with his artist-friend Jirayr “Jerry” Zorthian — the same friend to whom Feynman’s timeless ode to a flower was in response. Eventually, the two agreed that they’d exchange lessons in art and science on alternate Sundays. Feynman went on to draw — everything from portraits of other prominent physicists and his children to sketches of strippers and very, very many female nudes — until the end of his life.

The Art of Richard P. Feynman: Images by a Curious Character (UKpublic library) collects a quarter century of Feynman’s drawings, curated by his daughter Michelle, beginning with his first sketches of the human figure in 1962 and ending in 1987, the year before his death.

Dancer at Gianonni’s Bar (1968) Continue reading…
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The Art of Rock Balancing by Michael Grab

Michael Grab is an artist that has been ‘rock balancing‘ since 2008. Much of his recent work has been done around the Boulder, Colorado area. Grab finds the process both spiritual and therapeutic. On his site gravityglue.com, Grab explains:

“The most fundamental element of balancing in a physical sense is finding some kind of ‘tripod’ for the rock to stand on. Every rock is covered in a variety of tiny to large indentations that can act as a tripod for the rock to stand upright, or in most orientations you can think of with other rocks. By paying close attention to the feeling of the rocks, you will start to feel even the smallest clicks as the notches of the rocks in contact are moving over one another.

Parallel to the physical element of finding tripods, the most fundamental non-physical element is harder to explain through words. In a nutshell, I am referring to meditation, or finding a zero point or silence within yourself. Some balances can apply significant pressure on your mind and your patience. The challenge is overcoming any doubt that may arise.”

On gravityglue you will find an extensive gallery of his work along with videos, an in-depth interview and an active blog about his thoughts that accompany his work.

art of rock balancing by michael grab gravity glue (13) Continue reading…

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Corridors of the Mind

ARCHITECTS HAVE BEEN talking for years about “biophilic” design, “evidence based” design, design informed by the work of psychologists. But last May, at the profession’s annual convention, John Zeisel and fellow panelists were trying to explain neuroscience to a packed ballroom.

The late-afternoon session pushed well past the end of the day; questions just kept coming. It was a scene, Zeisel marveled—all this interest in neuroscience—that would not have taken place just a few years earlier.

Zeisel is a sociologist and architect who has researched the design of facilities for Alzheimer’s patients. Architects, he explains, “understand about aesthetics; they know about psychology. The next depth to which they can go is understanding the brain and how it works and why do people feel more comfortable in one space than another?” Continue reading…

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Gorgeous Long-Exposure Photographs of Golden Waves

I know I do post a lot of pictures of waves – but look at these! They’re too gorgeous not to share.

With a preference for the early morning light, artist David Orias enjoys capturing saturated hues and motion that our eyes could not otherwise see in these gorgeous ocean scenes. His series, entitled Waves, features golden hues and stunning painterly strokes that blend together into these vibrant and expressive images. But, don’t be fooled, what you see before your eyes aren’t paintings, they are actually photographs!

The California-based artist uses long exposures and a telephoto lens to capture a wide range of motion that fuse together nicely in these peaceful scenes. Thanks to the dawn sunlight as well as the California atmosphere, he captures an impressive palette of color combinations. He explains, “Southern California has its fire season and sometimes this creates conditions of eerie orange light in the morning as the sunlight is filtered and scattered by smoke particles. This creates unusual and to some viewers unrealistic colors. I take the baseline colors and work with them to create a fine art appeal.” Continue reading…

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