Posts from the ‘animation’ category

Disney rendered its new animated film on a 55,000-core supercomputer

Disney’s upcoming animated film Big Hero 6, about a boy and his soft robot (and a gang of super-powered friends), is perhaps the largest big-budget mash-up you’ll ever see. Every aspect of the film’s production represents a virtual collision of worlds. The story, something co-director Don Hall calls “one of the more obscure titles in the Marvel universe,” has been completely re-imagined for parent company Disney. Then, there’s the city of San Fransokyo it’s set in — an obvious marriage of two of the most tech-centric cities in the world. And, of course, there’s the real-world technology that not only takes center stage as the basis for characters in the film, but also powered the onscreen visuals. It’s undoubtedly a herculean effort from Walt Disney Animation Studios, and one that’s likely to go unnoticed by audiences. Continue reading…

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How Laika Pushed 3D Printing to New Heights with ‘The Boxtrolls’

Via Cartoon Brew

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BY 

Today at SIGGRAPH 2014, Laika is presenting a session about the making of their upcoming stop motion feature The Boxtrolls and among the presenters is Brian McLean, the studio’s Director of Rapid Prototyping. During a recent trip to Laika’s Portland, Oregon-based studio to visit the set of Boxtrolls, Cartoon Brew chatted extensively with McLean (pictured below) about the revolutionary introduction of the 3D printer into the stop motion production pipeline. Continue reading…

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REVIEW: “The 16th Animation Show of Shows”

My favorite in the “The 16th Animation Show of Shows” was “We Can’t Live Without Cosmos” directed by Konstantin Bronzit of Russia. Has anyone else had a chance to see any of these?

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Article by Fred Patten via IndieWire.com

Every year Ron Diamond, the founder of Hollywood’s Acme Filmworks animation studio (specializing in animated television commercials), puts together an Animation Show of Shows, consisting of his pick of about a hundred minutes’ worth – a dozen or so — of the best animated short films of the year, from those shown around the world at international film festivals, for presentation at over forty major animation studios and schools in California, Oregon, and Washington (Disney, DreamWorks, Pixar, Sony Pictures, Illumination, ILM, UCLA Animation Workshop, San Jose State University, ASIFA chapters in Hollywood, Portland, Seattle, etc.), several East Coast states, and selected locations around the world. The winner of the following year’s Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film has often been included on an Animation Show of Shows program. Continue reading…

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Advice for Young Animators

“The love for animation alone is not enough to start a career. You have to prepare and improve your skills. This is a craft like any other and requires the mastery of certain techniques. To paraphrase Tiana’s dad: ‘You can wish upon a star, but you have to back it up with hard work.'” Good advice!

Andreas

Here is a letter written by Andreas Wessel-Therhorn, former animator atWalt Disney Animation Studios.

Wessel-Therhorn’s feature film credits include The Thief and the Cobbler, A Goofy Movie, Balto, All Dogs go to Heaven 2, Space Jam, Hercules, Tarzan, Fantasia/ 2000, The Emperors New Groove, Looney Tunes: Back in Action, Home on the Range, Curious George, and The Princess and the Frog, to name a few. Continue reading…

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We’re losing all our Strong Female Characters to Trinity Syndrome

“…the Strong Female Character With Nothing To Do—is becoming more and more common.” Interesting read.

DreamWorks’ How To Train Your Dragon 2 considerably expands the world introduced in the first film, and that expansion includes a significant new presence: Valka, the long-lost mother of dragon-riding protagonist Hiccup, voiced by Cate Blanchett. The film devotes much of its sweet, sensitive middle act to introducing her, and building her up into a complicated, nuanced character. She’s mysterious and formidable, capable of taking Hiccup and his dragon partner Toothless out of the sky with casual ease. She’s knowledgable: Two decades of studying dragons means she knows Toothless’ anatomy better than he does. She’s wise. She’s principled. She’s joyous. She’s divided. She’s damaged. She’s vulnerable. She’s something female characters so often aren’t in action/adventure films with male protagonists: She’s interesting.

Too bad the story gives her absolutely nothing to do.

Continue reading…

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Examples of Experimental Design

After getting my MFA in Experimental Animation, I’ve had a lot of explaining to do. This post, via CreativeBloq, helps shed a little light on the whole “experimental” factor.

These examples of experimental design are all pushing the boundaries of technology. Take a glimpse into the future of design…

It’s fair to say that designers are fascinated by technology. But it isn’t the tech itself that’s of interest – it’s what can be achieved via experimental design.

Whether for commercial purposes or personal projects, here we look at some fantastic examples of how designers have pushed technologies and platforms into new, and often unexpected directions – all creating amazing work in the process.

01. Digital Fireworks

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Revolution: The Lifecycle of Water Told in a Stop Motion Pop-Up Book

 

Revolution is an animated short by photographer Chris Turner, paper engineer Helen Friel and animator Jess Deacon that explores the life cycle of a single drop of water through the pages of an elaborate pop-up book. The book contains nine scenes that were animated using 1,000 photographic stills shot over the course of a year.

Via Colossal

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A Six Year Old’s Imagination Becomes Adorable Viral Short Film

This is just so freaking adorable and happy, I have to share.
[vimeo http://vimeo.com/58659769 w=600&h=381]

We all get a little scared sometimes. Scared of graduating school without a plan; scared of monsters. One six year old has a remedy: think of something else until the “nervous has gone out of you.” Think of juice, pizza, and a piano shaped chocolate chip cookie. In other words, he says, “when the scared feeling comes into you, the scared is scared of things you like.” This is all advice told to filmmaker Bianca Giaever, who asked one very clever child to tell her a story…about anything…so that she could turn it into a movie.

The story she heard was as brilliant as the film she created to go along with the narrative. Giaever explains on her Vimeo, “I asked a six year old what my movie should be about, and this is what he told me.” Watching the finished product leaves you wondering what other genius we’d learn of if children’s voices were heard a little bit more often. And the good news is that given the internet success her short has already had, Giaever probably doesn’t need to be scared about graduating school anymore.

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Corridors of the Mind

ARCHITECTS HAVE BEEN talking for years about “biophilic” design, “evidence based” design, design informed by the work of psychologists. But last May, at the profession’s annual convention, John Zeisel and fellow panelists were trying to explain neuroscience to a packed ballroom.

The late-afternoon session pushed well past the end of the day; questions just kept coming. It was a scene, Zeisel marveled—all this interest in neuroscience—that would not have taken place just a few years earlier.

Zeisel is a sociologist and architect who has researched the design of facilities for Alzheimer’s patients. Architects, he explains, “understand about aesthetics; they know about psychology. The next depth to which they can go is understanding the brain and how it works and why do people feel more comfortable in one space than another?” Continue reading…

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