The Science of Awe

Cedar Wright enjoys a view of the long way down, moments after getting the first ascent of the Virgin Tower in Enshi Grand Canyon National Park, China

“Scientifically speaking, the storm brought me into a state of awe, an emotion that, psychologists are coming to understand, can have profoundly positive effects on people. It happens when people encounter a vast and unexpected stimulus, something that makes them feel small and forces them to revise their mental models of what’s possible in the world. In its wake, people act more generously and ethically, think more critically when encountering persuasive stimuli, like arguments or advertisements, and often feel a deeper connection to others and the world in general. Awe prompts people to redirect concern away from the self and toward everything else. And about three-quarters of the time, it’s elicited by nature.”
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San Diego Scientist Illuminates Link Between Light And Health

Evening Edition

Above: We all know that proper diet, exercise, and sleep can improve our health. But emerging research suggests we might want to consider something else, too. Something so ubiquitous, few of us ever stop to reflect on it. That something is light. KPBS science reporter David Wagner profiled one San Diego researcher who’s illuminating the importance of getting light in the right amount at the right time.

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Beautiful Chemistry

“Beautiful Chemistry is a project collaboration between the Institute of Advanced Technology at the University of Science and Technology of China and Tsinghua University Press. The goal of this project is to bring the beauty of chemistry to the general public through digital media and technology. Continue reading…

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5 Things UX And UI Designers Could Learn From Wes Anderson

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Director Wes Anderson has always been distinguished for his visual artistry, detail-rich sets, and storybook-like imagery. From the whimsical, campy feel of Moonrise Kingdom to the carefully crafted sets and miniatures in The Grand Budapest Hotel, Anderson’s movies are visual masterpieces.

The design-conscious filmmaker has some practices in common with successful mobile user interface (UI) and user experience (UX) designers. Professional designers can learn to improve their apps by studying the director’s techniques and implementing such practices within their creative processes. Here are five key tips:

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Movie Theaters Hope To Add Another Dimension To Their Profits

Theaters that call themselves 4-D use lights, moving seats, fog and even sprays of water and air to give moviegoers a unique experience — one they hope audiences will consider worthy of higher ticket prices.

Theaters that call themselves 4-D use lights, moving seats, fog and even sprays of water and air to give moviegoers a unique experience — one they hope audiences will consider worthy of higher ticket prices.

Some experimental features have been popping up in movie theaters lately. One of them is a so-called 4-D experience. It’s hard to describe in words exactly what a 4-D movie experience feels like, but here’s one attempt: it is intense. Continue reading…

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Clouds crashing in the sky

Definitely to be seen as large as possible – Alex Schueth captured a timelapse of a rare cloud formation called a undulatus asperatus during a storm over Lincoln, Nebraska. Holy Guacamole!

There’s an incredible 16-second sequence in this video of clouds, starting at around 10 seconds in. It looks as though the sky is a roiling ocean wave about to crash on the beach. I’ve watched it approximately 90 times so far today.

It’s worth making the video fullscreen and pumping it up to the max quality (2160p!) to see it properly. Continue reading…

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Scientists Recover Audio by Analyzing Tiny Vibrations in a Bag of Chips

Sheer crazy coolness.

Using a high-speed camera, scientists at MIT have been able to passively recover audio by analyzing minute vibrations, effectively turning everyday objects into ‘Visual Microphones’. You can read more about this fascinating work by Abe Davis, Michael Rubinstein, Neal Wadhwa, Gautham J. Mysore, Fredo Durand and William T. Freeman at the MIT project page. Continue reading…

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Slow Life

Daniel Stoupin shot 150,000 photos in order to put together this less-than-four-minute video, with every frame consisting of between three and 12 shots. Definitely to be seen full screen in HD – the bigger the better.

Well, I don’t even have the words to describe what this is; you just have to watch it. Preferably in fullscreen at full resolution. Takes about 30 seconds to get going but once it does………dang. Breathtaking is not a word I throw around after every TED Talk or Milky Way time lapse, but I will throw it here.

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How to heal our smartphone-addled, overworked brains

The biggest casualty of everyone being so connected is productivity. No one is getting much done at the office. A few ways you can maintain a healthy brain at work.

FORTUNE — When cars first became popular 100 years ago, there were no road rules or speed limits to begin with. Inspired by the freedom of their speedy new toys, drivers zoomed around as fast as they could. Crashes were a constant.

Today’s speedy new toys, the smartphone and tablet, help people work when, where, and how they want. Excited by their newfound freedom, people are staying connected 24/7, working as fast as they can. The crashes this time are less obvious but still producing pain.

A creative team that used to debrief with their client by video once a week from the office is now on video daily from their tablets. A software project that took six people a few months to complete is now broken into hundreds of parts for micro developers to finish in a week. While these ideas may sound enticing, there are implications to moving this fast, as HP HPQ -0.87% discovered with tablets and Apple aapl 0.10% with maps. Continue reading…

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How Laika Pushed 3D Printing to New Heights with ‘The Boxtrolls’

Via Cartoon Brew

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BY 

Today at SIGGRAPH 2014, Laika is presenting a session about the making of their upcoming stop motion feature The Boxtrolls and among the presenters is Brian McLean, the studio’s Director of Rapid Prototyping. During a recent trip to Laika’s Portland, Oregon-based studio to visit the set of Boxtrolls, Cartoon Brew chatted extensively with McLean (pictured below) about the revolutionary introduction of the 3D printer into the stop motion production pipeline. Continue reading…

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REVIEW: “The 16th Animation Show of Shows”

My favorite in the “The 16th Animation Show of Shows” was “We Can’t Live Without Cosmos” directed by Konstantin Bronzit of Russia. Has anyone else had a chance to see any of these?

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Article by Fred Patten via IndieWire.com

Every year Ron Diamond, the founder of Hollywood’s Acme Filmworks animation studio (specializing in animated television commercials), puts together an Animation Show of Shows, consisting of his pick of about a hundred minutes’ worth – a dozen or so — of the best animated short films of the year, from those shown around the world at international film festivals, for presentation at over forty major animation studios and schools in California, Oregon, and Washington (Disney, DreamWorks, Pixar, Sony Pictures, Illumination, ILM, UCLA Animation Workshop, San Jose State University, ASIFA chapters in Hollywood, Portland, Seattle, etc.), several East Coast states, and selected locations around the world. The winner of the following year’s Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film has often been included on an Animation Show of Shows program. Continue reading…

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Advice for Young Animators

“The love for animation alone is not enough to start a career. You have to prepare and improve your skills. This is a craft like any other and requires the mastery of certain techniques. To paraphrase Tiana’s dad: ‘You can wish upon a star, but you have to back it up with hard work.'” Good advice!

Andreas

Here is a letter written by Andreas Wessel-Therhorn, former animator atWalt Disney Animation Studios.

Wessel-Therhorn’s feature film credits include The Thief and the Cobbler, A Goofy Movie, Balto, All Dogs go to Heaven 2, Space Jam, Hercules, Tarzan, Fantasia/ 2000, The Emperors New Groove, Looney Tunes: Back in Action, Home on the Range, Curious George, and The Princess and the Frog, to name a few. Continue reading…

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