Posts from the ‘school’ category

The Science of Awe

Cedar Wright enjoys a view of the long way down, moments after getting the first ascent of the Virgin Tower in Enshi Grand Canyon National Park, China

“Scientifically speaking, the storm brought me into a state of awe, an emotion that, psychologists are coming to understand, can have profoundly positive effects on people. It happens when people encounter a vast and unexpected stimulus, something that makes them feel small and forces them to revise their mental models of what’s possible in the world. In its wake, people act more generously and ethically, think more critically when encountering persuasive stimuli, like arguments or advertisements, and often feel a deeper connection to others and the world in general. Awe prompts people to redirect concern away from the self and toward everything else. And about three-quarters of the time, it’s elicited by nature.”
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San Diego Scientist Illuminates Link Between Light And Health

Evening Edition

Above: We all know that proper diet, exercise, and sleep can improve our health. But emerging research suggests we might want to consider something else, too. Something so ubiquitous, few of us ever stop to reflect on it. That something is light. KPBS science reporter David Wagner profiled one San Diego researcher who’s illuminating the importance of getting light in the right amount at the right time.

Continue reading…

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Movie Theaters Hope To Add Another Dimension To Their Profits

Theaters that call themselves 4-D use lights, moving seats, fog and even sprays of water and air to give moviegoers a unique experience — one they hope audiences will consider worthy of higher ticket prices.

Theaters that call themselves 4-D use lights, moving seats, fog and even sprays of water and air to give moviegoers a unique experience — one they hope audiences will consider worthy of higher ticket prices.

Some experimental features have been popping up in movie theaters lately. One of them is a so-called 4-D experience. It’s hard to describe in words exactly what a 4-D movie experience feels like, but here’s one attempt: it is intense. Continue reading…

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Advice for Young Animators

“The love for animation alone is not enough to start a career. You have to prepare and improve your skills. This is a craft like any other and requires the mastery of certain techniques. To paraphrase Tiana’s dad: ‘You can wish upon a star, but you have to back it up with hard work.'” Good advice!

Andreas

Here is a letter written by Andreas Wessel-Therhorn, former animator atWalt Disney Animation Studios.

Wessel-Therhorn’s feature film credits include The Thief and the Cobbler, A Goofy Movie, Balto, All Dogs go to Heaven 2, Space Jam, Hercules, Tarzan, Fantasia/ 2000, The Emperors New Groove, Looney Tunes: Back in Action, Home on the Range, Curious George, and The Princess and the Frog, to name a few. Continue reading…

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Adaptive Room Personalizes Its Settings to Soothe Workplace Stress

In collaboration with a dynamic team of academics and professionals in mental health, Philips created a healing space that adapts to meet individual stress-relieving needs. Depending on where users stand, the room changes its shape and soundscapes to create new calming ambient experiences. This open space is built to combat various work-related tensions such as burnout and anxiety. Ideally, this innovation will fit perfectly in hospitals, mental healthcare facilities and even airports.

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Three key themes are introduced in order to reduce people’s stress levels: paced breathing, personal balance, and ambient experience. Embedded sensors under the soft flooring of this high-tech sanctuary trigger space partitions that enclose different areas. When a person moves from one area to another, they intuitively create their own individual space. Soothing rhythms and tones are generated by the people in room, nothing is prerecorded. To help re-energize people, pulsating lights that range in color and hues were installed to help control their pace of breath. Continue reading…

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Corridors of the Mind

ARCHITECTS HAVE BEEN talking for years about “biophilic” design, “evidence based” design, design informed by the work of psychologists. But last May, at the profession’s annual convention, John Zeisel and fellow panelists were trying to explain neuroscience to a packed ballroom.

The late-afternoon session pushed well past the end of the day; questions just kept coming. It was a scene, Zeisel marveled—all this interest in neuroscience—that would not have taken place just a few years earlier.

Zeisel is a sociologist and architect who has researched the design of facilities for Alzheimer’s patients. Architects, he explains, “understand about aesthetics; they know about psychology. The next depth to which they can go is understanding the brain and how it works and why do people feel more comfortable in one space than another?” Continue reading…

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Czech Animation Legend Břetislav Pojar Dies at 89

I had the great honor of meeting Mr. Pojar while studying in the Czech Republic last summer. The mechanics of his puppets are stunning and ingenious and his animations heartfelt. I thought that Cartoon Brew had a nice compilation of his work (shown below), so please take a moment and enjoy.

One of the giants of 20th century animation, Czech animator and director Břetislav Pojar, died last Friday evening [link to story in Czech newspaper]. He was 89. After studying architecture in college, Pojar started his animation career in the early-1940s. He was among the first group of artists to work at the state-run Studio Bratri v triku in Prague. There, he met Jiří Trnka, and in the mid-1940s, he left with Trnka to start a new animation studio. Pojar became Trnka’s key animator on numerous puppet shorts in the late-1940s and early-1950s, including Story of the Bass Cello, The Emperor’s Nightingale, and Old Czech Legends. Even after Pojar became a director, he continued to animate on Trnka’s later films like A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Continue reading…

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The Future of Storytelling: Immersion, Integration, Interactivity, Impact

BY: 

A new study from research consultancy Latitude lays out “The Future of Storytelling.”

As technology becomes more advanced and more accessible across multiple platforms, it’s only natural for consumers to expect increasingly higher standards of creativity and engagement from content creators. However, with social media, apps, tablets, smartphones, websites, TV, etc. all part of the audience’s viewing habit, learning how stories should be evolving and how to make narratives work across platforms is a complicated matter. A new study offers some perspectives on what audiences may be looking for in their stories. Continue reading…

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Millefiori

The shapes, you see in these image are about the size of a thumbnail. They are created by mixing ferrofluid with water color and putting it into a magnetic field.
Ferrofluid is a magnetic solution with a viscosity similar to motor oil. When put under a magnetic field, the iron particles in the solution start to rearrange, forming the black channels and separating the water colors from the ferrofluid. The result are these peculiar looking structures.

On itsnicethat.com, you can find out more about the project

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Why Movies Like Oscar-Winning ‘Undefeated’ Make Grown Men (and Women) Cry

The newly minted Oscar winner for best documentary, Undefeated, has left many critics gushing—with praise, but also tears. The true-life sports tale follows a struggling high school football team in a poor area of Memphis, Tennessee, whose fortunes begin to turn under the guidance of a devoted and determined coach. The emotional story has reduced folks at ForbesEsquire, and other media outlets to sniffles and sobs. It made us wonder: What actually causes people to cry at movies? Continue reading…

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How meditation can reshape our brains (and revisiting neuroplasticity)

I learned some of this at MARC (at UCLA) and found it fascinating.

Neuroplasticity is visited in this video. I often post about neuroplasticity and how that concept allows us to understand that we can heal and change our health and wellbeing by changing our brains.

Neuroscientist Sara Lazar’s amazing brain scans show meditation can actually change the size of key regions of our brain, improving our memory and making us more empathetic, compassionate, and resilient under stress.

Found on beyondmeds.com

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